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Glossary of Health and other Care Professionals

How can the Brain Injury Group help you?

About Glossary of Health and other Care professionals

Here we have a summary of the professionals involved in treating and supporting people affected by serious personal injuries in particular.

Please Note: This glossary is for information only.

We also have a glossary of clinical terms where you can find lay man’s definitions of many of the clinical conditions, procedures and terms associated with brain injury.

Glossary of Health and other Care professional

A Glossary of Health and other Care professionals

Injuries caused by a sudden change in direction or speed of travel (of the head) that jolts the brain against the inside of the skull, causing damage to the brain at its point of impact with the skull. In addition, the inevitable movement of the opposite side of the brain away from the inside of the skull may distort brain tissue there, causing an additional ‘contra-coup’ injury.

 

In ACT a negative thought is accepted as a thought but reflected upon using one or a combination of three broad approaches: mindfulness, acceptance and review of values.

Injury to the brain not due to congenital or developmental disorders. Causes include a lack of oxygen to the brain at or since birth, a traumatic brain injury (TBI), intracranial infection, tumour or stroke.

Routine personal health and hygiene activities that people do on a daily basis without needing assistance. The six basic ADLs are: eating, bathing, dressing, toileting, transferring (walking) and continence.

The period of time immediately after a sudden injury has occurred, when the person may be at their most vulnerable and needing urgent treatment.

A pattern of psychological and emotional response to a traumatic event that unintentionally impedes rather than assists recovery, rehabilitation and re-integration into society.

The science of establishing the causes and origins of disease.

Impaired formation and/or retrieval of memories. The duration of Post-Traumatic Amnesia (PTA) is the lapse of time after the injury before new memories can be formed. The duration of Retrograde Amnesia is the length of time immediately prior to the injury for which memory of events that occurred (and information that had been acquired) has been lost.

Relief of or masking of pain.

Loss of the sense of smell.

Swelling or dilation of an artery due to a weakened wall.

Severe hypoxia (lack of oxygen supply to brain tissue).

Medication used to control or prevent epileptic fits (seizures), whether major or minor in severity.

Medication used to reduce or prevent nausea or vomiting.

Lack of interest, emotion, enthusiasm or excitement. Could result from brain injury to frontal lobe structures which concern emotion, and which affect motivation and forward planning – but apathy is also commonly experienced in depression and boredom.

Inability to express oneself in words or to understand what is said or written. (Strictly speaking, aphasia means a complete loss of language function while dysphasia is a partial loss of language but in practice the two terms tend to be used interchangeably.)

Inability to plan and perform purposeful or skilled movements, while still having the basic ability to move and be aware of movement. Apraxia is the complete loss of this ability, dyspraxia implies partial loss.

How can the Brain Injury Group help you?

About Glossary of Health and other Care professionals

Here we have a summary of the professionals involved in treating and supporting people affected by serious personal injuries in particular.

Please Note: This glossary is for information only.

We also have a glossary of clinical terms where you can find lay man’s definitions of many of the clinical conditions, procedures and terms associated with brain injury.

Glossary of Clinical Terms

A Glossary of Health and other Care professionals

Injuries caused by a sudden change in direction or speed of travel (of the head) that jolts the brain against the inside of the skull, causing damage to the brain at its point of impact with the skull. In addition, the inevitable movement of the opposite side of the brain away from the inside of the skull may distort brain tissue there, causing an additional ‘contra-coup’ injury.

 

In ACT a negative thought is accepted as a thought but reflected upon using one or a combination of three broad approaches: mindfulness, acceptance and review of values.

Injury to the brain not due to congenital or developmental disorders. Causes include a lack of oxygen to the brain at or since birth, a traumatic brain injury (TBI), intracranial infection, tumour or stroke.

Routine personal health and hygiene activities that people do on a daily basis without needing assistance. The six basic ADLs are: eating, bathing, dressing, toileting, transferring (walking) and continence.

The period of time immediately after a sudden injury has occurred, when the person may be at their most vulnerable and needing urgent treatment.

A pattern of psychological and emotional response to a traumatic event that unintentionally impedes rather than assists recovery, rehabilitation and re-integration into society.

The science of establishing the causes and origins of disease.

Impaired formation and/or retrieval of memories. The duration of Post-Traumatic Amnesia (PTA) is the lapse of time after the injury before new memories can be formed. The duration of Retrograde Amnesia is the length of time immediately prior to the injury for which memory of events that occurred (and information that had been acquired) has been lost.

Relief of or masking of pain.

Loss of the sense of smell.

Swelling or dilation of an artery due to a weakened wall.

Severe hypoxia (lack of oxygen supply to brain tissue).

Medication used to control or prevent epileptic fits (seizures), whether major or minor in severity.

Medication used to reduce or prevent nausea or vomiting.

Lack of interest, emotion, enthusiasm or excitement. Could result from brain injury to frontal lobe structures which concern emotion, and which affect motivation and forward planning – but apathy is also commonly experienced in depression and boredom.

Inability to express oneself in words or to understand what is said or written. (Strictly speaking, aphasia means a complete loss of language function while dysphasia is a partial loss of language but in practice the two terms tend to be used interchangeably.)

Inability to plan and perform purposeful or skilled movements, while still having the basic ability to move and be aware of movement. Apraxia is the complete loss of this ability, dyspraxia implies partial loss.

Supporting individuals and families affected by brain injury

Contact

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enquiries@braininjurygroup.co.uk

Brain Injury Group, 55 Spring Gardens, Manchester, M2 2BY.

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