For the fifth successive year Brain Injury Group will be promoting Road Safety Week in schools across the country with the support of our member firms to raise public awareness of road safety.

The theme for the 2018 campaign is Bike Smart, focusing on the safety of road users on two wheels, both cyclists and motorcyclists.

More than one third of people killed or seriously injured on UK roads are travelling by bicycle or motorcycle, and more than 100 bike riders are injured every day in preventable crashes according to statistics on road casualties. 1

The week long campaign (19-25 November), organised by road safety charity Brake, will raise awareness about the importance of protecting those on two wheels by focusing on:

  • policy-makers being Bike Smart by implementing a safe systems approach, mandating lifesaving technology and prioritising cycle-friendly infrastructure
  • drivers being Bike Smart by looking out for those on two wheels, driving safely and slowly and giving bike riders plenty of space
  • cyclists and motorcyclists being Bike Smart through safe riding behaviours, appropriate training, clothing and equipment

“We deal with people affected by brain injury daily, and the campaign resonates with our members because of the great work they do to support those individuals and families affected,” says Sally Dunscombe, director of the Brain Injury Group. “Preventable road crashes and casualties could be reduced significantly if all road users were more alert to their surroundings, changed their behaviour just a little and showed more consideration; Road Safety Week is an initiative that reminds people how every individual can improve the safety for entire communities. It also promotes greater public health because a safer environment will lead to people being more confident to walk and cycle more, which in turn will reduce pollution.”

Campaigners, community groups, schools and businesses can register for Brake’s free action pack here.

The Road Safety Week website can be found here.

 

[1] Reported road casualties Great Britain: 2016, Department for Transport, 2017